Fears Of Violence Unfounded, Gerrymandering On The Way Out

A new president is sworn in, and the day comes and goes without major incidents in Ohio or elsewhere. Security was stepped up significantly around the Statehouse, and a lot of people showed up armed, but the event stayed non-violent - quite a contrast from a protest on January 6 that sparked several brawls.

Four Ohioans have been charged in the insurrection at the US Capitol, including a man and a woman from Champaign County who claim to be members of the Ohio State Regular Militia, a group tied to the far-right anti-government Oath Keepers. 20 hate groups are being tracked in Ohio.

In the two weeks following the Capitol riot, investigations have been opened into the Capitol Police and into whether members of Congress gave tours to people who later stormed the building. Democratic Youngstown area Congressman Tim Ryan chairs the subcommittee that funds the Capitol Police. He said it’s been hard to work in the building that was stormed by rioters, including two Capitol Police officers who’ve been suspended.

 

As the Biden administration takes over, the pandemic is as bad as it’s ever been. Ohio is approaching 9500 confirmed deaths and three quarters of a million confirmed cases.

And as more groups become eligible for the vaccine, there are problems getting it.

This week Republican Gov. Mike DeWine wrote to Biden, asking for more vaccines and money and including a personal note to the new president.

 

 

 

Guests: 

Mark Pitcavage, Anti-Defamation League

US Congressman Tim Ryan (D-OH 13)

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